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and they are turning to technology for answers. >> i think some of the things like european colleagues are doing have a real potential in this country. >> you know civil libitarians have a problem with that and the expansion of it. you think the line is shifting? >> i do. i remind you that civil lib terians have a problem with everything they can find. >> bret: you would find a receptor. >> it is more receptors in the naysayers. americans are growon ups. >> we can improve your security. they haven't brought it to boston and they don't know what the cam ras will show i don't think yet. but we can do a lot more with advanced technologies without giving up our freedom and i don't think americans feel they have to give up freedom. >> in the change after the attack and our consciousness after the threat do you think? >> it depends on what the source of the threat seems to be. if it looks like a foreign attack it could have an impact and lookks like a domestic yes, it will have a different affect. >> they are scouring video tape looking for the bomber or bombers and the technology is there stop those bombe
of technology of reengaging the public to see something and say something. better intelligence or take a better look at what local law enforcement is seeing. this was my worst nightmare. who didn't have a prior criminal record. someone that got radicalized without a footprint and dame out of nowhere. components for the bomb can be bought at a local store. >> heather: is this something we should see from now on and how do we protect ourselves without becoming a police state? >> the 9/11 cut off the head of al-qaeda. the ability to do the same type of attack is really over. this is what they have to go to now. the challenge is how do you know when someone is radicalized? the key is in talking with commissioner kelly and his team, they switch up everything. it's not about static security. you don't have people that do the same type of patrols. you mix it up. >> heather: flexibility? >> also you use different type of technology. facial recognition is not where it ought to be. cameras are after the event but we need that kind of technology pro-active. the other key is not sit back and say we have to
technology works. you go into places like grand central station you see some of the devices. they have markings from the epa on it. we also had some project bio shield and some other legislation that create ad group within the department of health and services to contract for things like vaccines and antidotes for some of these agents. we haven't funded early stage science looking at next generation of science to help protect us against future threats. jenna: being you worked in the government and the private sector what do you think is the government's role in that? some of us think, the government must have vials of antidotes stashed somewhere when something happens to help us. where is the government's role in this? where is the private sector and how do we best prepare if that is something we should be watching for? >> we'll have to provide substantial incentives for people to do the investment there is no natural market. the government is only purchaser. they trade the antidotes to hope to get stockpiled by the government and that is not a good environment. when companies lose out
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3